Simple sentences


The Simple Sentence

A simple sentence is a sentence structure that contains one independent clause and no dependent clauses. It has the most basic elements that make it a sentence: a subject, a verb, and a completed thought.

The use of compound subjects, compound verbs, prepositional phrases (such as “at the bus station”), and other elements help lengthen simple sentences, but simple sentences often are short. The use of too many simple sentences can make writing “choppy” and can prevent the writing from flowing smoothly.

A simple sentence can also be referred to as an independent clause. It is referred to as “independent” because, while it might be part of a compound or complex sentence, it can also stand by itself as a complete sentence.

The subject and predicate are often described as a topic and a comment, what is being talked about (the subject) and what is being said about it (the predicate). Each of these elements is characterized by a combination of three elements or perspectives

Simple sentences, contain a subject and verb and express a complete thought, but they can also contain a compound subjects or verbs.

Simple sentences can be very short, consisting of only one word (a

noun) for the subject and one word (a verb) for the predicate. The noun is called

the simple subject, and the verb is the simple predicate.

Examples

The runner jumped.

This simple sentence has one independent clause which contains one subject, runner, and one predicate, jumped.

In the backyard, the dog barked and howled at the cat.

This simple sentence has one independent clause which contains one subject, dog, and one predicate, barked and howled at the cat. This predicate has two verbs, known as a compound predicate: barked and howled. This compound verb should not be confused with a compound sentence. In the backyard and at the cat are prepositional phrases.

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