How to teach English to 6, 7, 8 years old students..

The beginners of any language are blank papers in which anything is written. Therefore, the little learners can be introduced the world of language using any effective method. When it comes to learning English as a new language, the same method by which a child learns his/her language can be adopted. How does a child picks up his mother tongue. It is by listening and imitating to his/her parents and relatives. When he joins a schools, the classmates also start influencing them.

It is very important that we must make a passive learning community where the learners learn passively with ease and without much effort. It happens only when teachers, and his or her friends start conversing in English and in a flawless manner. If errors are made by them they are perpetuated. Teachers must bear in mind that language is a skill than a subject to be taught. It should happen effortlessly. Let the little children learn passively. Vocabulary and grammar should thus be learned automatically. Children of this age tend rely largely on teachers. they trust their teachers deeply. They think their teachers are infallible. They never make any mistake.

Therefore, when teachers make some grammatical mistakes in their talk and verbal communication, children learn them and start using them.So each teacher should try to use English carefully.

The Listeners by Walter de la Mare

Walter de la Mare craftily evokes in the reader a sense of mystery and suspense in the poem, “The Listeners”.  The opening question asked by the traveller, “Is there anybody there” with poses a question to every reader a fundamental question- Do we have an awareness of where we are. Instead of using ‘here’, the poet deliberately uses ‘there’ to evoke an indifferent attitude of the listeners. In fact nobody listens and responds. The ghosts just stand in awe but they don’t respond. The questions are again and again reverberated and resounded in the open air which indirectly teases the indifferent attitude of those who encounter the traveler.

The need of doing one’s duty without thinking or worried about the outcome or other’s reaction to it is aptly depicted when the traveller says, ” Tell them  I came, and no one answered that I kept my word”. The every word he uttered echoed through the shadowiness of the still house. Just do our duty and withdraw from the front paving way for others. Life after all a duty and a journey that happens in a wilderness or at a ‘house of ghosts’ where the expected response wouldn’t happen.

Exam tips for those who appear for board exams (CBSE)

Dear students,

Let me begin by asking you the following questions:

  • Are you on the verge of taking one of your most important exams in your lives?
  • Are you tensed?
  • Do prepare with a meticulous plan for the exam?
  • Do your teachers and parents scare you with their predictions and expectations?
  • How much time do you spend to study?
  • Which subject do you find it very difficult and easy?
  • Which learning materials and guides do you use?
  • Do you rely on some guides and other supplementary materials?
  • Are you confused?
  • Do you have exam fever and exam-related  stress?

If you say yes to any of these questions, here are some tips for you:-

  • After all, your board exam is not the end of the world. You have a long way to go. Don’t take it so seriously that you spoil your remaining life. In my personal opinion, it is just another exam with some importance. It may be decisive of your career, but not your life. In the present exam pattern you are likely to come up with flying colours. So be cool and composed. Don’t be anxious and tensed up.
  • Make a plan for your study. Study systematically. Divide your time judiciously. Spend more time for difficult subjects like mathematics and science. But never neglect any subject totally. A meticulous plan will boost your confidence and will-power. Your plan should match with your school’s plan so that you may  have a  smooth run.
  • Spend some time for physical exercise every day. It is not scientific and healthy to spend too much time for study. You need to occasionally rejuvenate your body. Go for a walk. Spend some time talking to your friends. But don’t use smart phones because it will stress your eyes. Listen to good music. It will quieten your mind.Be thoughtless for some time.
  • Try to improve your learning skills through practice. Work on your hand writing. Try to improve your memory through some memory enhancing techniques.Improve your vocabulary through reading. Work also with your listening skills.
  • Know your strengths and weaknesses. Don’t try to live up to the expectation of your parents and teachers. They may have unrealistic dreams and hopes. You know who you are. Be happy with what you have. Stop comparing with others. Stop competing with others. Don’t be jealous of others. There may be some one who is better than you in some subjects. But remember you have your own unique ability which others do not have. Try to work on that instead of being jealous of others. Accept yourself who you are and what you are.

Diary of the grandmother of Sudha Murty.

Thursday,

13/04/2016

Today when I touched the feet of my grandmother and when she gifted me the novel, Kashi Yatre, I was in fact elevated to the  heights of satisfaction and glory. I feel free and independent. My teacher has done a good job. I never thought that I could learn Kannada alphabet so soon. At this old age, it is  like a  great dream come true for me. Now I can explore the wonderful world of letters. I get immense pleasure in reading the books. As the novel depicts an old lady who takes after me, it represents the lives of many people. It will take me to different horizons of knowledge. After completing this novel I am going to read a few more books. Thank god before my death I will be able to read enormously. Now I realize the real meaning of freedom and independence. Learning has no barriers of age and gender. Anyone who is determined can learn to read and write. I now regret the days I spent in vain.

The gold frame by R.K Lakshman- humour revealed from anxiety and phobia

The other day, I was assigned with some classes for VIII Standard. I was very happy to glance through the Main Course Book, Buzzward Series. I found some fabulous collection of short stories. The first one, the above mentioned one gave me a great momentum. It seemed that the writer has deliberately used very good vocabulary which adds a lot of hum our aesthetic significance to the story.

The story evolves around Dutta, who runs ‘The Modern Frame Works” shop where the photos are framed.

Modal Verbs: an overview with examples $ links

Must – to have to, or to be highly likely. Must can be used to express 100% certainty, a logical deduction or prohibition depending on the context.

  • It must be hard to work 60-hours a week. (probable)
  • You must listen to the professor during the lecture. (necessity)
  • She must not be late for her appointment. (necessity)
  • It must not be very hard to do. (probable)

Can – to be able to, to be allowed to, or possible. Can is a very common modal verb in English. It’s used to express ability, permission and possibility.

  • It can be done. (possible)
  • She can sleepover at Sara’s house this weekend. (allowed to)
  • The car can drive cross country. (able to)
  • It cannot be done. (impossible)
  • The doctor said he cannot go to work on Monday. (not allowed to)
  • She cannot focus with the car alarm going off outside. (not able to)

Could –to be able to, to be allowed to, or possible. Could is used when talking about an ability in the past or for a more polite way to ask permission.

  • Mark could show up to work today. (possible)
  • Could I come with you? (allowed to)
  • When I was in college I could stay up all night without consequence. (able to)
  • Mark could not come to work today. (possible/allowed)
  • Last night I could not keep my eyes open. (able to)

May – to be allowed to, it is possible or probable

  • May I sit down here? (allowed to)
  • I may have to cancel my plans for Saturday night. (possible/probable)
  • She may not arrive on time due to traffic. (possible)

Might – to be allowed to, possible or probable. Might is used when discussing something that has a slight possibility of happening, or to ask for permission in a more polite way.

  • Chris might show up to the concert tonight. (possible/probable)
  • Might I borrow your computer? (Many people don’t say this in American English, instead they would say Can I borrow your computer? Or May I borrow your computer?)

Need – necessary

  • Need I say more? (necessary)
  • You need not visit him today. (not necessary)

Should – to ask what is the correct thing to do, to suggest an action or to be probable. Should usually implies advice, a logical deduction or a so-so obligation.

  • Should I come with her to the dentist? (permission)
  • Joe should know better. (advice/ability)
  • It should be a very quick drive to the beach today. (possibility)
  • Margaret should not jump to conclusions. (advice)

Had better – to suggest an action or to show necessity

  • Evan had better clean up the mess he made. (necessity)
  • Megan had better get to work on time tomorrow. (necessity)

Will – to suggest an action or to be able to

  • John will go to his second period class tomorrow. (action)
  • It will happen. (action)
  • She will see the difference. (be able to)
  • Eva will not drive the Volkswagen. (not do an action)
  • Joe will not study tonight because he has to work. (not be able to)

Would – to suggest an action, advice or show possibility in some circumstances

  • That would be nice. (advise/possibility/action)
  • She would go to the show, but she has too much homework. (action)
  • Mike would like to know what you think about his presentation. (action)
  • modal auxiliaries

Here are some useful links:-

  1. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/auxiliary.htm
  2. http://www.myenglishpages.com/site_php_files/grammar-lesson-modals.php
  3. http://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/grammar/hilfsverben1.htm
  4. https://www.tesol-direct.com/tesol-resources/english-grammar-guide/modal-auxiliary-verbs/
  5. http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/modal-auxiliary-verbs
  6. http://www.perfect-english-grammar.com/modal-verbs.html
  7. http://www.learnenglish.de/grammar/verbmodal.html

Three men In a Boat movie

Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) published in 1889, is a humorous account by English writer Jerome K. Jerome of a two-week boating holiday on the Thames from Kingston upon Thames to Oxford and back to Kingston. The book was initially intended to be a serious travel guide, with accounts of local history along the route, but the humorous elements took over to the point where the serious and somewhat sentimental passages seem a distraction to the comic novel. One of the most praised things about Three Men in a Boat is how undated it appears to modern readers – the jokes seem fresh and witty even today.

The three men are based on Jerome himself (the narrator Jerome K. Jerome) and two real-life friends, George Wingrave (who would become a senior manager at Barclays Bank) and Carl Hentschel (the founder of a London printing business, called Harris in the book), with whom Jerome often took boating trips. The dog, Montmorency, is entirely fictional but, “as Jerome admits, developed out of that area of inner consciousness which, in all Englishmen, contains an element of the dog.” The trip is a typical boating holiday of the time in aThames camping skiff This was just after commercial boat traffic on the Upper Thames had died out, replaced by the 1880s craze for boating as a leisure activity.

Following the overwhelming success of Three Men in a Boat, Jerome later published a sequel, about a cycling tour in Germany, titledThree Men on the Bummel (also known as Three Men on Wheels, 1900).

The story begins by introducing George, Harris, Jerome (always referred to as “J.”), and Jerome’s dog, a fox terrier called Montmorency. The men are spending an evening in J.’s room, smoking and discussing illnesses from which they fancy they suffer. They conclude that they are all suffering from “overwork” and need a holiday. A stay in the country and a sea trip are both considered. The country stay is rejected because Harris claims that it would be dull, the sea-trip after J. describes bad experiences of his brother-in-law and a friend on sea trips. The three eventually decide on a boating holiday up the River Thames, from Kingston upon Thames to Oxford, during which they will camp, notwithstanding more of J.’s anecdotes about previous mishaps with tents and camping stoves.

They set off the following Saturday. George must go to work that day, so J. and Harris make their way to Kingston by train. They cannot find the right train at Waterloo Station (the station’s confusing layout was a well-known theme of Victorian comedy) so they bribe a train driver to take his train to Kingston, where they collect the hired boat and start the journey. They meet George further up river atWeybridge.

The remainder of the story describes their river journey and the incidents that occur. The book’s original purpose as a guidebook is apparent as J., the narrator, describes passing landmarks and villages such as Hampton Court PalaceHampton ChurchMagna Carta Island and Monkey Island, and muses on historical associations of these places. However, he frequently digresses into humorous anecdotes that range from the unreliability of barometers for weather forecasting to the difficulties encountered when learning to play the Scottish bagpipes. The most frequent topics of J.’s anecdotes are river pastimes such as fishing and boating and the difficulties they present to the inexperienced and unwary and to the three men on previous boating trips.

The book includes classic comedy set pieces, such as the story of two drunken men who slide into the same bed in the dark, the Plaster of Paris trout in chapter 17, and the “Irish stew” in chapter 14 – made by mixing most of the leftovers in the party’s food hamper:

I forget the other ingredients, but I know nothing was wasted; and I remember that, towards the end, Montmorency, who had evinced great interest in the proceedings throughout, strolled away with an earnest and thoughtful air, reappearing, a few minutes afterwards, with a dead water-rat in his mouth, which he evidently wished to present as his contribution to the dinner; whether in a sarcastic spirit, or with a genuine desire to assist, I cannot say.

— Chapter 16

Other memorable sections include chapter 3’s description of the author’s Uncle Podger creating chaos while hanging a picture, and chapter 4’s discussion of “Advantages of cheese as a travelling companion”.

 

 

CBSE evaluation criteria for grade XI and XII

 

Class XI
The academic session is divided into two terms:>
I Term: April to September
II Term: October to March
In each term the students of class XI are assessed on the basis of Cycle Test for each subject followed by Terminal Examinations. The evaluation criteria is as follows:
Examination Weightage
  I Cycle Test 10%
  Half yearly Examination 30%
  II Cycle test 10%
  Comprehensive(Final) Examination 50%
   Class XII

Students of class XII appear for Board Examinations conducted by CBSE in the month of March. However, they also appear for a round of Cycle Tests and Terminal Examination in addition to the Pre Board Examination conducted by the school during the academic session.

Continuous and comprehensive evaluation -CBSE

   Classes I-V

The academic session is divided into three terms.
I Term– April to August
II Term– September to November
III Term– December to March

Scholastic Areas
The students are evaluated on various parameters through oral and written Class tests, Cycle tests, Activity tests and daily class performances throughout the term for all the subjects. Special emphasis is laid to enhance reading, writing and conversation skills in both English and Hindi.
Various competitions such as Hindi and English Calligraphy, Recitations, Creative Writings and Spell Bee Competitions, Maths, Science and General Knowledge Quiz are organized to make the evaluation system more activity oriented.
Co-scholastic Areas
In line with CCE system, General Knowledge, Environmental Education, Physical Education, skills in Art, Music and Dance, Computers and Reading skills are assessed regularly. In addition, Art and Craft competitions, Music and Dance Competitions, Sports activities are also used as an evaluation tool.
Life Skills
The Life skills depicting the personal traits of a student are judged in accordance with CCE system. These consist of qualities such as confidence, obedience, regularity and punctuality, discipline, respect towards others and school property, neatness etc.
The term wise weightage for scholastic areas in an academic session is as follows:

Class I Term
(April  to August)
    II Term
( September  to  November)
       III  Term
( December  to  March)
  I,II & III            30%                   35%                  35%
  IV & V            35%                   35%                  30%
   Classes VI – X

The academic session is divided into two terms:
I Term: April to September
II Term: October to March
Each child is assessed in both scholastic and co-scholastic areas. For the assessment of the scholastic areas, each term will have two formative assessment(FA) and one summative assessment(SA). The weightage  of each assessment in a term for an academic session is as follows:

Period of assessment April-July July-September September October-December December-March March
 Type of assessment  FA  1  FA  2  SA 1  FA  3 FA  4 SA  2
 VI -X  10%  10%   30%  10% 10% 30%

Assessment of Co- scholastic areas is reported once in class IX and class X each. The students are assessed on various parameters for life skills , work education, visual and performing arts, and attitudes and values towards teachers, schoolmates, school programmes and environment.
The students are also assessed for literary and creative skills, scientific skills, information and communication technology and organizational and leadership skills. In addition, the students also participate in various health and physical activities and are assessed by the teachers accordingly.